MSLiberal icon occupies place of honor the Smithsonian, despite her belief blacks should be exterminated

The taxpayer-funded Smithsonian Institution has refused a request by black pastors to remove a bust of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger from the “Struggle for Justice” exhibition of great Americans.

The Smithsonian included Sanger claiming she fought for justice, ignoring the fact she actually perpetrated a racial struggle.

The pastors point out Sanger does not deserve the honor, since she founded Planned Parenthood for the express purpose of exterminating black people from the United States.

“Perhaps the Gallery is unaware that Ms. Sanger supported black eugenics, a racist attitude toward black and other minority babies, an elitist attitude toward those she regarded as ‘the feeble minded;’ speaking at a rally of Ku Klux Klan women; and communications with Hitler sympathizers,” the letter from Ministers Taking a Stand states.

“Also the notorious ‘Negro Project,’ which sought to limit, if not eliminate black births, was her brainchild,” the letter states. “Despite these well-documented facts of history, her bust sits proudly in your gallery as a hero of justice.”

Ariana Grossu of the Family Research Council’s Center for Human Dignity offers these direct Sanger quotes:

“I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan … I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses … I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak … In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered” (Margaret Sanger, An Autobiography, Page 366)

“While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfit. They are excellent means of meeting a certain phase of the situation, but I believe in regard to these, as in regard to other eugenic means, that they do not go to the bottom of the matter.” (Birth Control and Racial Betterment, Feb. 1919, The Birth Control Review).

“Eugenics without birth control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit” (“Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” Feb. 1919, The Birth Control Review).

“Stop our national habit of human waste.” (Woman and the New Race, 1920, Chapter 6).

“By all means, there should be no children when either mother or father suffers from such diseases as tuberculosis, gonorrhea, syphilis, cancer, epilepsy, insanity, drunkenness and mental disorders. In the case of the mother, heart disease, kidney trouble and pelvic deformities are also a serious bar to childbearing No more children should be born when the parents, though healthy themselves, find that their children are physically or mentally defective.” (Woman and the New Race, 1920, Chapter 7).

“The main objects of the Population Congress would be to apply a stern and rigid policy of sterilization and segregation to that grade of population whose progeny is tainted, or whose inheritance is such that objectionable traits may be transmitted to offspring[;] to give certain dysgenic groups in our population their choice of segregation or sterilization.” (A Plan for Peace, 1932).