His home was invaded by thugs with guns.

He wrestled the gun away from the would-be robber and shot him…

Now the homeowner is facing criminal charges.

Despite the fact Canada does have a law to protect crime victims from prosecutors, the victim is being held under house arrest.

The fact that the prosecutors are ignoring this law is why this story should be important to Americans.  What the prosecutors are saying is the victim didn’t follow all the regulations and technicalities while he was fighting for his life.

While many states have laws that are designed to protect citizens who use firearms to protect themselves from home invaders, anti-gun judges and prosecutors still go after the crime victims for violating statutes that require firearms to be stored in safes.

In this case, the Canadian is charged with:

“attempted murder, intent to discharge a firearm, intent to discharge a firearm when being reckless, careless use of a firearm, improper storage of a firearm, pointing a firearm, possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose, unauthorized possession of a firearm, possession of a firearm knowing that possession is unauthorized, and possession for the purpose of trafficking.”

No jury would convict someone who is defending himself of attempted murder, but they might on the legal technicalities.  This story illustrates why these laws are so dangerous.

From The Chronical Herald:

A man is charged with attempted murder and a raft of firearms offences after helping fend off home invaders, one of whom he’s now charged with shooting.

Kyle Earl Munroe was arrested on July 12 after RCMP and Halifax Regional Police responded to a report of a home invasion involving firearms at a home in Porters Lake.

Police said that three men entered the residence with guns and a struggle took place with two men inside.

The two in the home seized a firearm from one of the suspects and several shots were fired as the suspects fled. Police later located one of the suspects, who had non-life-threatening gunshot wounds.

Munroe faces charges of attempted murder, intent to discharge a firearm, intent to discharge a firearm when being reckless, careless use of a firearm, improper storage of a firearm, pointing a firearm, possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose, unauthorized possession of a firearm, possession of a firearm knowing that possession is unauthorized, and possession for the purpose of trafficking.

“Right now they’re just pending charges,” said spokeswoman Chris Hansen at the Public Prosecution Service.

Munroe is banned from any contact with two named individuals, must attend court as ordered, keep the peace and be of good behaviour, not leave his residence except for essential activities such as work or medical appointments, remain in Nova Scotia, not consume drugs or alcohol, not possess a cellphone or pager, have no weapons, and answer the door to police when they check at his home.

Munroe is due back in Dartmouth Provincial Court on Aug. 22 for election and plea.

This case is eerily similar to that of another Canadian two years ago.

From St. Catharine Standard:

“The whole thing reminds me of Ian Thomson, an Ontario man who went through a similar ordeal a few years ago. In that case, Thomson woke up to four men throwing Molotov cocktails at his home. Living a long way from police the former firearms instructor fired warning shots at his assailants, put out the fire that could have burned down his home and then called police.

He was charged and also faced more jail time than his attackers.

Thomson was acquitted but not before he was forced through a lengthy court battle that has ruined him financially.

This sort of thing isn’t supposed to happen anymore; it shouldn’t have happened in the past. But in February 2012, to deal with overzealous police and prosecutors, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced changes to the law in what he called the Citizen’s Arrest and Self Defence Act.

“Our government is committed to putting real criminals behind bars,” Harper said. “Canadians who have been the victim of a crime should not be re-victimized by the criminal justice system. That’s why we have introduced changes to the Criminal Code so Canadians know they have the law on their side and that our justice system targets criminals and not victims.”

These stories should remind US citizens how dangerous so-called “common sense gun control” really can be when you have an anti-gun district attorney with a bad attitude.